Katharine Hayhoe Reframes Christian ‘Belief’ in Climate Change

By path2positive

Climate communications often revolve around the question, 'Do you believe in climate change?' To which, Evangelical, climate scientist, Katharine Hayhoe responds, "Do you believe in gravity?"

During her recent speech at the "Religion and the Roots of Climate Change Denial" panel, Hayhoe examined why climate change should not be presented as a 'belief.' In using the word 'belief,' we unknowingly create two separate, but related conundrums. The term belief, implies that an acceptance of climate science will replace religious faith, while simultaneously presenting scientific fact as a debatable issue. Both of which are misleading and detrimental to overall climate communications.

Watch the video below to see how Katharine Hayhoe is re-framing the issue of climate change and religion!


Religion and the Roots of Climate Change Denial

By Boston College Front Row

Katharine Hayhoe, associate professor of political science at Texas Tech University and director of the university's Climate Science Center, talks about her research on the social and political impacts of climate change. Stephen Pope, professor of theology at Boston College, provides the response.

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