Does Your Climate Strategy Have a Human Element?

By path2positive

The earth will survive climate change. Our planet has spun through various degrees of ecological transition, with cold and warm periods altering its landscape. The current (human induced) change, however, is happening faster than ever before, and while the planet will sustain itself, human civilization is less resilient. 

Apart from this reality offering an accurate assessment of climate change, it holds a greater value in garnering public support for climate action when integrated into our messaging strategies. Put simply, Americans are more inclined to act on climate change when the issue is framed in a human context. 

As you develop strategies for climate advocacy in 2016, consider centering your outreach on the need to care for humans. This, of course, should not be misconstrued as a lack of concern for the ecosystem in which we live. Rather, it is a practical approach to the issues that matter most to people of faith by demonstrating how climate solutions will better care for those we love and future generations.

For more of the latest climate communication strategies, check out our new report, Let's Talk Climate.


What people get wrong about climate change

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