A recent IPSOS poll taken from 2,827 Americans found that two-thirds of respondents (62%) believe global leaders are morally obligated to act on climate change. Additionally, seventy-two percent of respondents feel that climate action is a personal, moral obligation.

Eric Sapp, executive director of the American Values Network, a faith-based environmental outreach initiative shared, "When climate change is viewed through a moral lens it has broader appeal."

The devastating affects of climate change on people around the world has caused many Americans to turn toward their religious beliefs to seek guidance on this moral imperative, granting faith leaders a unique opportunity.

Be the voice of moral action on climate change in your community by joining Blessed Tomorrow.


Most Americans See Combating Climate Change as a Moral Duty

By Bruce Wallace for Reuters

A significant majority of Americans say combating climate change is a moral issue that obligates them – and world leaders – to reduce carbon emissions, a Reuters/IPSOS poll has found.

The poll of 2,827 Americans was conducted in February to measure the impact of moral language, including interventions by Pope Francis, on the climate change debate. In recent months, the pope has warned about the moral consequences of failing to act on rising global temperatures, which are expected to disproportionately affect the lives of the world’s poor.

The result of the poll suggests that appeals based on ethics could be key to shifting the debate over climate change in the United States, where those demanding action to reduce carbon emissions and those who resist it are often at loggerheads.

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