The call has gone out for faith communities to divest from fossil fuels; and while many religious institutions have taken the call-to-action seriously, Rev. Jim Wallis has taken it personally. For 2015, the president of Sojourners, a founding partner of Blessed Tomorrow, has decided to divest his retirement funds from fossil fuel companies. Self admittedly, his actions won't bankrupt the oil industry, but they are symbolic of a commitment to saving God's creation.

These actions are representative of a moral commitment to repentance for what humans have done to the environment. Wallis shares, "While many associate repentance with sorrow or guilt, the biblical meaning of the word is to stop, turn around and go in a whole new direction. Repentance means changing our course and embarking on a new path." Seeking guidance from 'Solomon's cry,' Wallis understands his efforts, albeit personal, to be expressions of his unfaltering love for humanity; in turn, God.

With Lent quickly approaching for Christians around the world (February 18), perhaps we might consider giving up fossil fuels for the six-week period. Understandably, a complete removal of fossil fuels from your life could prove strenuous, so try removing one particular use of fossil fuels. For example, commit to taking public transportation one or two days a week for the entirety of Lent. Who knows, maybe at the end of Lent, you will find that you enjoy taking the train.

For more on Jim Wallis' fossil fuel divestment, and ideas on how to divest your own financial interest, read his article for Religious News Service.


Putting our money where our faith is by divesting from fossil fuels (COMMENTARY)

By Jim Wallis for Religious News Service

WASHINGTON (RNS) We’re a few weeks into 2015, which means many of us are striving to keep our New Year’s resolutions while others have already seen their best intentions collapse under the pressure of daily routines. Every year, we make promises to be better — we’ll go to the gym, save more money, slow down. But for Christians, every day is an opportunity to make resolutions. We call that repentance.

And this year — today — I am repenting of my dependence on fossil fuels.

While many associate repentance with sorrow or guilt, the biblical meaning of the word is to stop, turn around and go in a whole new direction. Repentance means changing our course and embarking on a new path.

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