Rev. Sally G. Bingham is the president and founder of Interfaith Power & Light, and a Blessed Tomorrow leader who has worked tirelessly on the issue of climate change for over 15 years. As an Episcopal Preist, Rev. Bingham understands the role of every person of faith in caring for the world's most vulnerable, bridging the gap between faith groups and non-faith groups alike. Rev. Bingham shared in a recent article penned for the Environmental Defence Fund, where she has been a board of trustee since 1989,

"All of us, Catholic or not, Christian or not, must recognise our responsibility and obligation to act in the face of human-induced climate change."

For Rev. Bingham, Pope Francis' Encyclical and visit to the U.S. have served as tools of inspiration and guidance in communicating on climate change. The longtime climate advocate understands that climate change, at its core, is an issue that impacts everyone, regardless of religious practice, and should, therefore, be addressed by everyone. Read more about Rev. Sally Bingham's climate initiatives here, and please visit Interfaith Power and Light to see how you can get involved in leading on climate action.


The Rev. Sally Bingham: Pope Francis' climate message speaks to all faiths

Sally G. Bingham | Environmental Defense Fund

should focus on solutions and our responsibility to act, often become political arguments. That’s why it’s so refreshing and important that Pope Francis, who will address Congress this month, is bringing us all back to what really matters.

The climate change debate should be about what kind of world we want to leave our children, and how we treat the most vulnerable among us.

I’m an Episcopal priest and have been working at the crossroads of religion and climate change for 15 years. I deeply respect Pope Francis’ powerful, moral voice.

All of us, Catholic or not, Christian or not, must recognize our responsibility and obligation to act in the face of human-induced climate change.

Pope Francis has reminded us that everyone has a moral responsibility to be a caretaker of God’s creation. At the very least, he says, we must not leave a damaged and unhealthy world to future generations.

We don’t want our children to ask, “You knew and you continued to pollute?”

Read More