Is Your Temple the Living Word of God?

By path2positive

In Ephesians 2:21, Christians are taught, "In whom the whole structure,  joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord." What does this temple look like, and how does it represent the way in which followers of Jesus practice their faith? Every Sunday, Christians around the world gather in their respective houses of worships to glorify the word of God, derived from scriptures that repeatedly teaches its followers to care for His creation (Genesis 2:15). Do our houses of worship follow this mandate from God?

Churches across America are beginning to realize that their temples can and should represent this very important decree by outfitting them with sustainable features such as solar panels or planting gardens that give forth a sustainable harvest. 

Lutheran Church of the Incarnation, a 50-year-old Davis, California church has taken this charge seriously. With necessary renovations under way, the congregation decided to include energy-efficient improvements, including new double-paned windows, extra insulation, low-flow toilets, a 'cool roof,' energy-efficient lighting, updated heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system qualified for a significant PG&E incentive payment plan. 

Learn more about adding sustainable renovation to you church from our partner, Interfaith Power and Light, or check out everyday tips on acting for the climate at Blessed Tomorrow. 


Davis church honored for energy-efficiency improvements

JoAnn B. Anderson | The Davis Enterprise

Inspired to care for God’s creation, Lutheran Church of the Incarnation in Davis received a Cool Climate Award for Energy Efficiency from California Interfaith Power & Light on Nov. 10. The award was presented by the Rev. Canon Sally Bingham, the organization’s president and founder, at a ceremony at The Cathedral of Christ the Light in Oakland.

Lutheran Church of the Incarnation, at 1701 Russell Blvd. in West Davis, is celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2015 with a complete energy makeover. Early this year, a major renovation and expansion of the church narthex, social hall, Sunday school, meeting rooms, kitchen and bathrooms was completed. The renovation included replacing the sanctuary roof and installing drought-tolerant landscaping.

Paul Kolarik, who chairs the Renovation Committee, explained that a green architect designed the renovation, which incorporates a full complement of energy-efficient improvements, including new double-paned windows, extra insulation, low-flow toilets, California native landscaping and Energy Star kitchen appliances. The measures taken went well beyond building code requirements for energy efficiency, Kolarik said.

A cool roof was installed over the renovated building and the sanctuary for a 7- to 15-percent energy savings. Energy-efficient lighting and a new heating, ventilation and air-conditioning system qualified for a significant PG&E incentive payment as well as a big increase in energy efficiency, he added.

Read More

 

 

Subscribe

Stay connected and get updates from Blessed Tomorrow.

Subscribe

You May Also Like

May 14, 2020

The must-attend, go-to webcast discussion for the most current and best thinking on climate change ecoAmerica is introducing Let’s Talk Climate to provide guidance and support to...

Read More

April 22, 2020

This is not a dress rehearsal. The entire world is immersed in unrelenting, multidimensional crises. These crises are not ideological. They are rooted in reality:...

Read More

April 14, 2020

Earth Day Network’s logo for Earth Day’s 50th anniversary For many of us, Earth Day is a pleasant memory from elementary school where our class...

Read More
logo-transparent

 

Blessed Tomorrow is a program of ecoAmerica

 

© ecoAmerica 2006 – 2020 The contents of this website may be shared and used under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial No Derivatives 4.0 International License.